×    46 notes
ronaldcmerchant:

the FACE BEHIND THE MASK (1941)

Why did this simple ordinary man become the underworld’s phantom terror?

ronaldcmerchant:

the FACE BEHIND THE MASK (1941)

Why did this simple ordinary man become the underworld’s phantom terror?

magictransistor:

Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.

that’s me in the fourth fifth one

that’s me with the sheep

head

STANDING NEAR THE CASTLE

(Source: taschen.com, via bluecohosh)

×    525 notes

zgmfd:

1961 Nu-Card Monster Panels

horror geekdom predicted meme-captioning forty years ahead. love and respect to the blue-light-absorbing horror massive, we are the future

(via aplacebothwonderfulandstrange)

×    714 notes
scandinspiration:

The Oseberg, a 9th-century Viking burial ship in Oslo, Norway

scandinspiration:

The Oseberg, a 9th-century Viking burial ship in Oslo, Norway

(Source: National Geographic, via epicus)

×    102 notes
aplacebothwonderfulandstrange:

rkahn:

meanwhilebackinthedungeon:

— Huth

That’s pallidmask's work!

So rad! Go Huth go!

want to have dreams about these dudes

aplacebothwonderfulandstrange:

rkahn:

meanwhilebackinthedungeon:

— Huth

That’s pallidmask's work!

So rad! Go Huth go!

want to have dreams about these dudes

×    84 notes
harperperennial:

largeheartedboy:

Today’s book and a beer: Blake Butler’s amazing novel 300,000,000 and a Sixpoint Bengali. #beer #books #lit #literature #nycbeer

Striking finished copies are out in the world! Beware.

I usually don’t tell people what I’m reading right now because I like to have a little secret only known to my family and whoever happens to see me reading in an airport or wherever, but I’m reading this right now and it’s such a thrill ride - it finds a way to frame Butler’s dense visions that makes them more lucid, more vivid, scarier

harperperennial:

largeheartedboy:

Today’s book and a beer: Blake Butler’s amazing novel 300,000,000 and a Sixpoint Bengali. #beer #books #lit #literature #nycbeer

Striking finished copies are out in the world! Beware.

I usually don’t tell people what I’m reading right now because I like to have a little secret only known to my family and whoever happens to see me reading in an airport or wherever, but I’m reading this right now and it’s such a thrill ride - it finds a way to frame Butler’s dense visions that makes them more lucid, more vivid, scarier

×    301 notes

waxunpleasant said: John, do you play d&d? what's your favourite class?

I played one session in junior high and was immediately killed by a ghost. The DM told me “you can’t fight this ghost, your HP are too low” but I didn’t really get the game at all and felt, philosophically, that every dog must have his day and anyone in battle stands your classic fighting chance. This was not the case and I was immediately killed by a ghost. I don’t hold it against the ghost he was just doing his thing.

I did start playing games when I was revising Wolf and now I have a weekly gaming night and we just played through a D&D dungeon I’m a Druid. I don’t have a “favorite class” though, it’s fantasy, part of the pleasure is trying on different skins to see how they feel — that’s really the point, right? If I play the same class all the time, then I’m really not exploring in the way I’d like to. That said, any character I play is probably going to express an interest in religion and magic, because, you know, me. 

×    171 notes

strangersbasement said: A question I was too nervous to ask last night at the book signing at Parnassus: A friend of mine told me (in a van on our way to Richmond, Va) that you would only work on a song for 3 days, and if it wasn't done by then, you would scrap it. I didn't believe this to be true but it has influenced some of my own "rules" for songwriting (urgency and all that), so I was wondering if you do, in fact, have any rules for songwriting/writing in general that you try hella hard to stick to?

I don’t have any rules at all, just tendencies. Generally speaking I finish a song in the same session where I sat down to write it. Generally speaking if it’s not done in a few days, I’m going to assume it has nothing of value to say and will just move along. If this were a rule it would be a really ridiculous one though given that both “This Year” and “Up the Wolves” were written over several sittings with resting times of several weeks or more. 

I do have rules of prosody that are actually more like religious beliefs to me (1. never change the way a word is pronounced to force it to fit the line / no forcing unstressed syllables to bear stress, ever) but that’s not really the same as what you’re talking about, I think. 

×    6,259 notes
dubdobdee:

woohoo! i mean woooo! woooo! 
danskjavlarna:

"By the sheen of the foam I beheld two skelingtons sitting in their coffins."  From The Story Hunter or Tales of the Weird and Wild by Ernest Richard Suffling, 1896.


I Am The Waving Skeleton

dubdobdee:

woohoo! i mean woooo! woooo! 

danskjavlarna:

"By the sheen of the foam I beheld two skelingtons sitting in their coffins."  From The Story Hunter or Tales of the Weird and Wild by Ernest Richard Suffling, 1896.

I Am The Waving Skeleton

(Source: oneletterwords.com)

×    1,268 notes
this generation asks for a gif, but the only gif it will receive is the gif of the swiped face

this generation asks for a gif, but the only gif it will receive is the gif of the swiped face

(Source: drewpsie, via jhrmn)



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