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dbeatdylan:

Creedence Clearwater Revival eating at a Taco Bell in 1968 (in SLO, CA)

had seen this picture, but hadn’t seen that it was the SLO Taco Bell
this is the Taco Bell from the town where I was a kid. the stone structure in the left of the frame, in the foreground, is a fire pit. it seemed like there was always a big-ass fire in the Taco Bell fire pit; it was an open fire, kind of hard to imagine now. I wonder if the A.M. OPEN checklist had “build big-ass fire out front” on it
I’m not sure what month in ‘68 my family moved from Indiana to California, or in what month this pic was taken, but I’m just going to state the obvious, I was there that day. I wasn’t vegetarian yet, and I was having a Beef Bell Grande. I was eighteen months old and a pretty good amateur photographer, and I took this picture, in exchange for which Fogerty put me on the guest list

dbeatdylan:

Creedence Clearwater Revival eating at a Taco Bell in 1968 (in SLO, CA)

had seen this picture, but hadn’t seen that it was the SLO Taco Bell

this is the Taco Bell from the town where I was a kid. the stone structure in the left of the frame, in the foreground, is a fire pit. it seemed like there was always a big-ass fire in the Taco Bell fire pit; it was an open fire, kind of hard to imagine now. I wonder if the A.M. OPEN checklist had “build big-ass fire out front” on it

I’m not sure what month in ‘68 my family moved from Indiana to California, or in what month this pic was taken, but I’m just going to state the obvious, I was there that day. I wasn’t vegetarian yet, and I was having a Beef Bell Grande. I was eighteen months old and a pretty good amateur photographer, and I took this picture, in exchange for which Fogerty put me on the guest list

(via occultobsession)

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imhoteprisesrises asked: I'm an aspiring songwriter having trouble pairing up my raw words with music. As someone with a hand in poetry, prose and songwriting do you have any advice on bridging that gap and turning text into a workable song?

I don’t write text first; learning to ad-lib lyrics out loud while playing, then fixing them up on the page, is one place you might start. I think of song as its own discipline - not of “the words to a song” - words and music make a song, they’re inseparable, for me they come into being simultaneously and grow together. If you’re trying to force an extant text to fit music, you’re going to end up intentionally putting stresses on unstressed syllables to make them fit the rhythm, which in my Church-of-One is total heresy, so words and music have to be written at the same time, lest the heresy hunters come, with their eyes all shiny and their lariats a-crackle.

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barbarastanwyck:

This was Judy Garland’s and, director of Easter Parade, Charles Walters’ idea that for once a lady that was up all night and distraught wouldn’t wake up looking like perfection with no sleep and no make up.The MGM executives saw the rushes with Judy wearing very little makeup and were appalled at the sight of an MGM star au natural. But since the scene played so well and Peter Lawford joked about her ‘looking horrible’ they decided not too reshoot it.

(via francesetherealgumm)

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waryalbatross asked: Hi John, there's a lot of stuff I want to ask you, but I've just had a terrible week of loss and rejection in my "budding art career" and it really sucks and it seems like something you would have a piece of wisdom for. How do you cope with putting your ego and life's work on the line over and over?

I tried to answer this a bunch of times but I don’t really know! You hold onto Berryman’s line — “It is idle to reply to critics” — and understand that the actual work isn’t the thing you make, but the process that makes it, whose inherent value and dignity is well beyond any debate, because it is an expression of your self and therefore nobody can really judge it. 

this is an unsatisfying answer, I know, artists have struggled with varying degrees of success over how to deal with these problems forever. the simple terrible platitudes of kindergarten are actually applicable here — the ones that tell you your work is good no matter what anyone thinks of it — but they seldom help much in the short term. in the long term, they do. people didn’t get very excited about Get Lonely when it was new. we were bummed! we felt it was our best work. we thought we’d gone somewhere special, unique in our work, its own place. over time, the people who relate to our impulse on that record have found it and connected with it, and the people who didn’t care for it have stopped thinking about it, because not many people spend a lot of time dwelling on work they didn’t care for.

but as I say this is a question people struggle with, I don’t think there’s a “here’s what you do” answer (and I reject, with thanks, any allegations that I am wise). you keep your focus on the work, I figure. when your focus wanders, you bring it back. 

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tapemachinesarerolling:

Wildfire Tommy Rich vs Ole Anderson

Tommy gave Ole a battle!!

tapemachinesarerolling:

Wildfire Tommy Rich vs Ole Anderson

Tommy gave Ole a battle!!

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“You know that San Francisco band Dragon?” – no such thing – “People say we sound like them.”

“Sure, Dragon, I know them.  They’re great.  I’ve got the perfect gig for you.”

Just like that.  No demo tapes, no references.  Just one call, and the gates of rock & roll fantasy swing wide.  The price is $525 (we are obligated to sell 75 tickets at $7 each) for an opening spot at Gazzarri’s on a Friday night.

“You know that San Francisco band Dragon?” – no such thing – “People say we sound like them.”

“Sure, Dragon, I know them. They’re great. I’ve got the perfect gig for you.”

Just like that. No demo tapes, no references. Just one call, and the gates of rock & roll fantasy swing wide. The price is $525 (we are obligated to sell 75 tickets at $7 each) for an opening spot at Gazzarri’s on a Friday night.

(Source: tim2articles.wordpress.com)

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you know what
I loved unicorns when I was eleven/twelve years old and then I learned that it was real soft and nerdy to love unicorns so I checked out of the whole unicorn-liking mindset because I felt a need to be hardening myself and copping a dark-stuff-only stance
then when I was 19 my girlfriend gave me a coffee cup with a unicorn on it and on receiving it I discovered that I had internalized some bullshit anti-unicorn stance and it made me sad
to those unicorns who didn’t get liked by me during my bullshit years: my bad, do you like carrots, I will leave a plate of carrots out by the back door, I also have oats

you know what

I loved unicorns when I was eleven/twelve years old and then I learned that it was real soft and nerdy to love unicorns so I checked out of the whole unicorn-liking mindset because I felt a need to be hardening myself and copping a dark-stuff-only stance

then when I was 19 my girlfriend gave me a coffee cup with a unicorn on it and on receiving it I discovered that I had internalized some bullshit anti-unicorn stance and it made me sad

to those unicorns who didn’t get liked by me during my bullshit years: my bad, do you like carrots, I will leave a plate of carrots out by the back door, I also have oats

(via her-dark-hands)

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forcingit asked: Do you do autographs and photos and such after shows? I'm coming tonight and want to correctly place my hopes on the spectrum of artist hang-out-iness.

These days I come out and sign stuff for sure, and I enjoy it more than I can say. It is great to say hello, I get a real boost from being able to really connect. I dislike having my picture taken; I end up consenting to pictures all the time, but I feel like I’m not being too too ornery of a person if I let people know how I actually feel, which is that I don’t like being photographed. I also get that people want pictures and that it’s sometimes important to them, so I want to be accommodating about it, because it’s in my nature to want to make people happy. So I figure a decent balance is to say, I’m up for it, theoretically, if it’s really important to you, but if my comfort’s of interest, the truth is I’ve hated being photographed all my life and wish there were some way of getting people to share my feeling that JD is best when there’s no pictures. 



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