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gyjm:

京都念慈菴乌梅糖(Nin Jiom Plum Candy)是以天然植物,配以乌梅精华,精心炼制。
购买:http://www.gyjm.com.cn/catalog/product/view/id/8150/

I have fallen in love with many candies in my life but the thing I have going on with Ni Jiom Herbal Candy, Ume Plum flavor is a very serious affair
this appears to be a simpler plum flavor or possible the same flavor in an earlier package design
whichever
this candy forever

gyjm:

京都念慈菴乌梅糖(Nin Jiom Plum Candy)是以天然植物,配以乌梅精华,精心炼制。

购买:http://www.gyjm.com.cn/catalog/product/view/id/8150/

I have fallen in love with many candies in my life but the thing I have going on with Ni Jiom Herbal Candy, Ume Plum flavor is a very serious affair

this appears to be a simpler plum flavor or possible the same flavor in an earlier package design

whichever

this candy forever

×    89 notes

christiannightmares:

God Likes Big Buts: A Louisiana church butchers Sir Mix-a-Lot (For the heads up, thanks to Jeff Wright; For a related video, click here http://christiannightmares.tumblr.com/post/469805809/blast-from-the-past-dan-smiths-baby-got-book)

there is something very charming to me about awkward Christian rapping. serious q though, can somebody whose Greek is less rusty than mine have a look at the scripture they cite:

Παρὰ ἀνθρώποις τοῦτο ἀδύνατόν ἐστιν, παρὰ δὲ θεῷ πάντα δυνατά.

Is that “for a human, these things are impossible, for God on the other hand they’re possible” - the δὲ is the “but” they want, right? also, this is often “with” instead of “for” - anybody got something on that?

and at any rate, the “but” has to be supplied by the English, right - δὲ doesn’t really work the same way, right? 

or not right? it’s been a while since I was doing this kinda wrestling and I’m just interested because in an alternate universe the Mountain Goats stopped existing in 1995  and all I do is think about questions like this, and while I prefer this universe, the alt is fun to think about sometimes

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mostlysignssomeportents:

meeshay:

soberchipmunk:

made a thing to wear at d&d tomorrow :3

this is cute

Ultimate D&D tee

see the tools on the table - the colors, the brushes, the stencils? that’s called commitment 

mostlysignssomeportents:

meeshay:

soberchipmunk:

made a thing to wear at d&d tomorrow :3

this is cute

Ultimate D&D tee

see the tools on the table - the colors, the brushes, the stencils? that’s called commitment 

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×    2,238 notes
art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] Scholars confirm first discovery of Japanese sword from master bladesmith Masamune in 150 years
by Casey Baseel
Should you visit a history museum in Japan, and, like I do, make an immediate beeline for the collections of samurai armor and weaponry, you might be surprised to notice that Japanese swords are customarily displayed with the stitching removed from the hilt. Visually, it sort of dampens the impact, since the remaining skinny slab of metal is a lot less evocative of it actually being gripped and wielded by one of Japan’s warriors of ages past.
The reason this is done, though, is because many Japanese swordsmiths would “sign” their works by etching their names into the metal of the hilt. Some craftsmen achieved almost legendary status, becoming folk heroes whose names are widely known even today.
The most respected of all, though, was Masamune, whose reluctance to sign his blades has made identifying them difficult. But difficult and impossible are two different things, and for the first time in over a century, a sword has been confirmed by historians as being the creation of the master himself.
Masamune was active during the late 13th and early 14th centuries, the part of Japan that today is part of Kanagawa Prefecture. He lived his life during the Kamakura Period, when the samurai class saw the most dramatic rise in its power over Japan.
Producing the highest-quality blades during a time of military power made Masamune’s swords extremely prized. Today, the only swordsmith who can approach his exalted historical status is Muramasa, who was born hundreds of years later. Justified or not, Muramasa is said to have been psychologically imbalanced and prone to violence. Superstition holds that these traits were passed on to the swords he forged, and as such Masamune’s are often held to be the superior weapons.
However, it can be hard to keep track of weapons in a country that’s gone through as many civil wars, revolutions, and occupations as Japan has, no matter how impressive their pedigree. Last year, a man brought a sword, which had found its way into his personal property, to the Kyoto National Museum to be appraised. Historian and sword scholar Taeko Watanabe spent the months between then and now studying the blade, and has recently announce her conclusion that it is a Masamune.
"Judging from its unique characteristics such as the pattern that can be seen in the side of the blade… it was unmistakably forged by Masamune."
The particular sword, which Watanabe says is called the Shimazu Masamune, had been given in 1862 by Iemochi, the 14th Tokugawa shogun, to the Imperial Family to mark his marriage to Princess Kazunomiya, also known as Princess Kazu.
"By presenting such a masterwork to the Imperial Family, Iemochi showed the deepest appreciation and highest respect," Watanabe commented.
Following this, the sword’s whereabouts were unknown until its anonymous owner brought it to the museum in Kyoto. It is the first blade to be confirmed as a Masamune in roughly 150 years.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rocket News 24


thinkin about swords this morning
this is some very very cool sword lore

art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] Scholars confirm first discovery of Japanese sword from master bladesmith Masamune in 150 years

  • by Casey Baseel

Should you visit a history museum in Japan, and, like I do, make an immediate beeline for the collections of samurai armor and weaponry, you might be surprised to notice that Japanese swords are customarily displayed with the stitching removed from the hilt. Visually, it sort of dampens the impact, since the remaining skinny slab of metal is a lot less evocative of it actually being gripped and wielded by one of Japan’s warriors of ages past.

The reason this is done, though, is because many Japanese swordsmiths would “sign” their works by etching their names into the metal of the hilt. Some craftsmen achieved almost legendary status, becoming folk heroes whose names are widely known even today.

The most respected of all, though, was Masamune, whose reluctance to sign his blades has made identifying them difficult. But difficult and impossible are two different things, and for the first time in over a century, a sword has been confirmed by historians as being the creation of the master himself.

Masamune was active during the late 13th and early 14th centuries, the part of Japan that today is part of Kanagawa Prefecture. He lived his life during the Kamakura Period, when the samurai class saw the most dramatic rise in its power over Japan.

Producing the highest-quality blades during a time of military power made Masamune’s swords extremely prized. Today, the only swordsmith who can approach his exalted historical status is Muramasa, who was born hundreds of years later. Justified or not, Muramasa is said to have been psychologically imbalanced and prone to violence. Superstition holds that these traits were passed on to the swords he forged, and as such Masamune’s are often held to be the superior weapons.

However, it can be hard to keep track of weapons in a country that’s gone through as many civil wars, revolutions, and occupations as Japan has, no matter how impressive their pedigree. Last year, a man brought a sword, which had found its way into his personal property, to the Kyoto National Museum to be appraised. Historian and sword scholar Taeko Watanabe spent the months between then and now studying the blade, and has recently announce her conclusion that it is a Masamune.

"Judging from its unique characteristics such as the pattern that can be seen in the side of the blade… it was unmistakably forged by Masamune."

The particular sword, which Watanabe says is called the Shimazu Masamune, had been given in 1862 by Iemochi, the 14th Tokugawa shogun, to the Imperial Family to mark his marriage to Princess Kazunomiya, also known as Princess Kazu.

"By presenting such a masterwork to the Imperial Family, Iemochi showed the deepest appreciation and highest respect," Watanabe commented.

Following this, the sword’s whereabouts were unknown until its anonymous owner brought it to the museum in Kyoto. It is the first blade to be confirmed as a Masamune in roughly 150 years.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rocket News 24

thinkin about swords this morning

this is some very very cool sword lore

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josb said: Ox Baker's in bad shape. His daughter set up a gofundme page for medical/funeral expenses.

I had not heard. The gofundme is here. His Facebook, which confirms that he’s needed hospitalization recently and is low on funds, is here

Ox, if it’s your time to go, know that you struck terror into the heart of a young boy who loved to get that fear from TV villains doing their depths-of-evil schtick: which is to say, you inspired me. 

And if it’s not your time yet, all that’s still true. Thanks Ox Baker. You brought a vision to life. 

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pharrfromheaven:

I thought this had gone missing. Glad I found it still in good condition. 

My tia took my mom to this concert seven years ago. After the show, they saw Marco Antonio Solis (or “El Buki” as they love to call him because of his previous band Los Bukis) leaving the arena in Hidalgo. They asked for his autograph. While he was signing these posters with a pen, my tia claims to have run her fingers through his beard (which has magic powers, I think). 

For years my mom had this poster next to a painting of “La última cena” (“The Last Supper”), which was oddly appropriate since so many people joke that Solis looks like the popular, European and North American depictions of Jesus Christ. 

automatic reblog for Marco Antonio Solis. if he actually still looked like that in 2007 then he is ageless and a lot of things we think we know about reality are gonna have to be rethought



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